Living

Sometimes parents of newly diagnosed children ask me for advice. I’m not so sure I have great words of wisdom, but one of the most important concepts I can share is to help your child strive towards independent living. Even if you don’t envision your child ever living without some type of supervision, making her as independent as possible will increase her self esteem and sense of well being. Resist the urge to do things for your child or to jump in when you see your child struggling with a task. Urge them to try to find different ways to approach difficult chores. Children and adults with hemiplegia are some of the most creative, out-of-the-box thinkers I’ve ever met. While you probably didn’t plan on your child having hemiplegia in order to develop great problem solving skills, this is one of the benefits of having the condition.

In this section of the CHASA site, you’ll find some helpful tips from parents of children who have hemiplegia. You’ll also find great videos and advice from teens and adults who’ve had hemiplegia since childhood. If you would like to contribute to this section of the website, we’d love your help. Contact CHASA.

Dressing - Ever tried to dress using just one hand? Parents and individuals with hemiplegia share tips.

Daily Living

In the Kitchen - Food preparation can be tricky with one hand. Adaptive tools and techniques can help.

In the Bathroom - From potty training to contact lenses. We’ll help you get ready in the morning.

Driving - Parents and young.